After Treatment Care - What To Do After Your Dental Visit

PAIN MEDICATIONS

Following most surgical or non-surgical procedures there may or may not be pain, depending on your threshold for pain. You will be provided with medication for discomfort that is appropriate for you. In most cases, a non-narcotic pain regimen will be given consisting of Tylenol (Acetaminophin) and Advil (Ibuprofen). These two medications alternated every 4 hours, will be as effective as a narcotic without any of the side affects associated with narcotics. If a narcotic has been prescribed, follow the directions carefully. If you have any questions about these medications interacting with other medications you are presently taking, please call your pharmacist.

INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RESTORATION TREATMENT

  • It is normal to be sore for 1-2 days where the anesthetic was placed.

  • It is normal to be sensitive to cold for one week to several months on a newly placed restoration. Some fillings are "deeper" than others and will be more sensitive for a longer period of time.

  • Sensitivity to heat may indicate nerve problems if it persists for more than one week and does not dissipate quickly (within seconds) after a stimulus is removed.

  • If the filling or temporary feels "high"-when you close down in your normal bite, it is the first thing that touches-then you should call the office so that we may adjust this for you. You do not have to be numbed and it only takes about 5-10 minutes.

  • Teeth that "throb" spontaneously or wake you up at night may be indicative of a pulpitis which will most likely need endodontic (root canal) therapy. If the doctor told you that your restoration was deep, this may occur. You should call the office and that time we may bring you back in for an x-ray or refer you directly to a specialist.

  • If you have any further questions, please call your treatment clinical coordinator who will be happy to talk with you.

CARE OF YOUR TEMPORARY RESTORATION

  • Do not floss around your temporary, as it may come out.

  • Do not eat anything sticky, such as chewing gum, jelly beans, or taffy. Extremely hard foods, such as peanut brittle, health food & granola bars should also be avoided as they will pull your temporary out.

  • Avoid chewing in the area the temporary is placed when possible.

  • It is not an emergency if your temporary dislodges. Please try the home remedies below and then call the office to schedule a recementation appointment. Remember to always bring the temporary with you. Generally, we can recement it quickly and most times without numbing. If you do not have your temporary recemented, it can cause teeth to shift and a new impression would have to be made, thus, delaying delivery of the final restoration.

  • Home remedies for loose temporaries: Try vaseline to secure it and avoid sensitivity. Denture adhesive creams or Temp It product at the drug store may secure it well enough until the office reopens. Orthodontic wax may be placed in the space to diminish sensitivity if the temporary is lost or if it is broken and sharp.

TRAY WHITENING SENSITIVITY

Occasionally patients may experience some tooth sensitivity to cold. This is usually mild, but sometimes it might be necessary to reduce the number of hours the trays are worn or even skip days. An over the counter analgesic such as Tylenol or Advil can help.

We can also prescribe a fluoride gel to help resolve any sensitivity. Please be sure to communicate with us if this is something that you need. It is possible that if you have extremely sensitive teeth to begin with, you may not be able to whiten successfully. Soft tissue or gum irritation (including sore throat) can result from overfilling the trays with the whitening solution. This is a minor irritation and can be resolved by discontinuing the whitening until the irritation has subsided. It can be prevented in future use by simply not overfilling the trays or wiping the excess off the gums with a tissue or toothbrush.

POST PERIODONTAL ROOT DEBRIDEMENT THERAPY

Your root debridement was done under a local anesthetic that will ensure your comfort during the procedure and for approximately one and a half hours after the appointment.

When the anesthetic wears off you may feel sensitive. Typically our patients do fine with Advil, Tylenol, or Aspirin. Taking the medication while still numb will help with minimizing any sensitivity that may occur.

We recommend using warm salt water rinses for a few days, two times a day to promote healing and soothing of the soft tissue. You may be sensitive to cold, so please let us know if this is a problem and we can make recommendations as necessary. Typically, we expect to get great results with no discomfort for you.

POST SEDATION INSTRUCTIONS

  • Patient cannot drive for 24 hours after sedation.

  • Do not operate any hazardous devices for 24 hours.

  • A responsible person should be with the patient until he/she has fully recovered from the effects of the sedation.

  • Patient should not go up and down stairs unattended. Let the patient stay on the ground floor until recovered.

  • Patient can eat whenever and whatever he/she wants.

  • Patient needs to drink plenty of fluids as soon as possible.

  • Patient may sleep for a long time or may be alert when he/she leaves. Attend to both alert or sleepy patient in the same manner, don't trust him/her alone.

  • Always hold patient's arm when walking.

  • Call us if you have any questions or difficulties. If you feel that your symptoms warrant a physician and are unable to reach us, go to the closest emergency room immediately.

POST EXTRACTION CARE

There will be a blood clot that forms in the site where the tooth is extracted. This clot acts as a band-aid for the hole. You should avoid the following to help prevent post-operative complications (ie, dry socket): smoking, spitting, vigorous rinsing, or drinking through a straw for three days after treatment. Allow 24 hours before rinsing with warm salt water. After that time, a salt water rinse done 3 times a day will help keep the area clean and free from infection.

For excessive bleeding, try moistening a tea bag, wrap it in gauze, and hold in place for 20 minutes. The tannic acid often reduces the bleeding. Also pressure on gauze for 20 minutes may help.


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